Full Case Study:
Visualising flooring in your home



Client: Kingfisher Digital  / Web App

CHALLENGE

In the U.K 1 in 10 consumers undertake a flooring project every year, with an average of £362 ($641) market spend. Customer research at Kingfisher (who own B&Q a chain of diy stores across the UK)  showed that before committing to a purchase, many customers were looking online for their flooring before going in store to look at them in real life and then making a decision to buy. Overwhelmed with choice on the website, customers found it difficult to compare flooring that was right for their needs. So how could we help them? This was our challenge.

“Overwhelmed with choice on the website, customers found it difficult to compare flooring that was right for their needs. So how could we help them? This was our challenge.”

MY ROLE

As part of an agile team, I helped develop the initial protoype for the MVP.

Sprint 1

01. SKETCHING + USER JOURNEYS

Our hypothesis was that we believed customers who were looking to buy flooring for their home, would be more confident in their choice if they were able to visualise that flooring in a room similar to their own. We would prove/disprove this by observing customers engaging with our visualisation tool and adding samples to their basket.

'Price, durability and design were three key areas of consideration when choosing flooring. People would make their own trade offs between these criteria based on their individual needs.”
- Research insight.

We sketched out some ideas for what our visualiser could look like taking in to account the three parameters 'price', 'durability' and 'design'. We wanted customers to play around with different kinds of flooring in a room space. We also considered various entry points in to the visualiser, for example through a google ad or from the diy.com landing page.

User Journeys: Exploring entry points in to the visualiser

02.ROUND ONE TESTING

I built a clickable prototype using Proto.io. The prototype didn’t have to be fully functional since were testing appetite for the service, so we limited it to show an ad for the tool on a product listing page which when clicked, would open the visualiser on a laminate flooring product as default. Users could then change the flooring from the menu.

Round 1 Prototype

Before going in-store to test on real customers we wanted to get some early validation, so we did some guerrilla testing with people in our network (the only screener being they'd home flooring project in the past). I created a discussion guide listing three main objectives:

1 ) To validate the clarity of the proposition
2) Identify any usability issues
3) Validate the usefulness of the data


Overall the prototype was well understood with just some tweaks needed to some interaction and information where we observed participants struggling.

Round 2 Prototype
Sprint 2

03. ROUND TWO TESTING

We took our iterated protoype in store to a B&Q branch. Our plan was to approach customers who were browsing around the flooring aisles, have a brief discussion with them asking what brought them to the store that day, then show them the prototype and capture their feedback. It was a quiet day with only a few people coming in, but we still managed to show the protoype to five customers, some who were couples.

Testing protoype in store with an iPad

KEY INSIGHTS:
Through one couple who we learned that being able to articulate ones’ vision to their partner helped them have a shared vision. The tool could help with this. We also learned that the tool should allow customers to not just change the wall colour, but also other products to complete a look. We would take these in to consideration when building out the future vision of the tool.


'…the tool should allow customers to not just change the wall colour, but also other products to complete a look.”
- In store customer insight.

04. MVP

I built out the roadmap for the visualiser through discussions with my team, taking in to consideration technical constraints and how we could deliver continuous improvement through a process of iteration.

The MVP (might be a bit different today)